Sacred Art

My work is divided into three categories of what can be considered ‘sacred art’:




Liturgical art has been created specifically for worship spaces. “The Stations of the Cross” are a timeless example of the visual narrative depicting Christ’s journey to the cross used particularly during the Lenten season. They are also devotional in the sense that they aid people in reflecting on the Passion as it relates to the value of self donation or personal sacrifice for the common good.

Devotional art includes depictions of the saints, people or places used to draw us into deeper states of reflection leading to meditation and contemplation. The image becomes a vehicle for a deepening experience of prayer or can provide encouragement in dark times.

Prophetic art is a visual response to a divine encounter. As we enter a contemplative state, at times images will appear to the inner imaginal or spiritual space…“eyes of the heart”. The desert fathers of the East called this spiritual faculty the “Nous” which combines the heart and mind into one unified sense. These forms are from a higher and deeper consciousness on the boundary of temporal and eternal time. I think of the Hubble telescope and it’s photos of Jupiter as an example of this boundary. There are fiery rings (halos) on both North and South poles of the Jupiter where the sun’s flares meet the planet’s atmosphere. The same is true of Earth but is invisible to the naked eye.